Tag Archives: LPC11U24

DipCortex is now mbed enabled

SolderSplash + ARM mbed

More exciting news, ARM have added support for our DipCortex platform to their mbed online compiler.

The ARM mbed team contacted us a month ago to talk about our DipCortex range with a view to expanding the mbed platform to support it. We got them a few of our prototype DipCortex’s and today they enabled it.

The big difference between mbed and other IDEs is that the compiler is online, you use it via your browser and your projects live in the cloud. This also has the advantage of there being many library’s for existing devices that shouldn’t require too many changes to get working, if any.

DipCortex - mbed platforms

DipCortex – mbed platforms

From today mbed users can now select which platform to build their code against, build the project which downloads a .bin file. This can then be dragged and dropped on to a DipCortex in boot mode.

Our next challenge is to port the CC3000 stack we have working with LPCxpresso to mbed. Stay tuned for more updates!

DipCortex – GPIO Intro Video and Guide

To help get you up and running and writing your own code for the DipCortex we have started our own GitHub repository, written a guide and uploaded a video.

Be sure to view at 720p so you can read the code!

This video takes you through the setup procedure, importing our codebase from GitHub, running through the code. Building it and boot-loading the bin file over the USB connection.

These guides are applicable for both the DipCortex’s and the up coming SolderBridges that use the same processors. We hope they are useful, if you have a preference for the subject of the next guide let us know!

DipCortex – ARM Cortex in a Dip Package with USB

This week we have been playing with another new product, the DipCortex. It’s an ARM Cortex M3/M0 in a 40 pin dip package and USB socket. It has two versions a NXP LPC1347 M3 and a LPC11U24 M0, the pin out roughly follows a certain range of 40pin 8bit micros.

DipCortex - Blank PCB

DipCortex – Blank PCB

It’s perfect for quickly prototyping a product on a bread board. Both have USB peripherals and a USB stack in ROM saving flash space. Updating the code can be performed by plugging it into the computer, holding both buttons and then releasing the reset button. A mass storage device then appears and firmware can be drag and dropped on to this drive. Press reset and the new code is executed. Have a look at the product page for more info.


DipCortex – 40 Pin ARM Cortex M3/M0

Meet the New SolderBridges

PCBs for Six new prototype SolderBridges arrived on Friday, thanks to our friends at Quartz TSL for the quick turnaround. Robs soldering skills have been put to the test soldering tiny Gyro’s and Barometers on to our IMU SolderBridge. This week we start testing and setting to work each board.


The first SolderBridge, DMX512, is working and on button press sends out DMX512 data. USB CDC is functioning sending and receiving serial data to the PC. As is the built in boot loader on all the SolderBridges we’ve powered up. Almost all the new SolderBridge have their own small ARM cortex M0 and can be used standalone, with other SolderBridges or on top of SplashBase for network connectivity/control.

Here are the six new SolderBridges :

More updates to follow. Interested in any of them, want more info? Drop us a comment to a tweet!

For more photos click “continue reading”

Continue Reading →

24 Channel Servo Controller

In the Lab this week Rob and I have worked on the upcoming range of SolderBridge Add-ons for the SplashBase board. The first one ready for prototyping is a 24 channel Servo controller. It utilises the stacking connector allowing the SplashBase to control all the Servo’s over the network. It has a selectable chip select line, meaning you can have up to 5 of these attached to a single SplashBase. Creating a tower which is able to control 120 servo’s ( if you do this please show us what you are making! )

At its core is a LPC11U24 a low power cortex M0 with built-in USB. The LPC11 will handle the SPI communication to the SplashBase ( Or your own board ) and the pulse timing for the 24 servo outputs. A separate terminal block is provided to allow connection of an external 5v supply, as under load servo power consumption can be high. The USB port allows drag and drop re-programming of the SolderBridge and will also allow control via USB. This means you could use this board with out and SplashBase and control it directly from your PC. It can also double up as a general M0 USB development board and you could use the 24 pins that are broken out for any thing. NXP provide a Free IDE called LpcXpresso, it has a code size limit but that it’s limit is higher than the size of the M0’s flash.

What do you think? Like the idea? is there anything to add, let us know in the comments!

Update : PCBs Ordered and a New Product page setup here

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